Quran Focus Academy Blog

When is Eid al Adha this year?

Eid al-Adha is the holiest celebration in the Islamic calendar and this year it falls on September 12, in most countries.

The name Eid al-Adha translates as the “festival of the sacrifice” or Bakr Eid and is also known as the “Greater Eid”.

The celebration marks the end of Hajj, the annual Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca which thousands of Muslims all over the world embark on.

It is different from Eid al-Fitr – which is the festival that comes immediately after Ramadan.

During Eid al-Adha, Muslims honour the day Prophet Ibrahim was about to sacrifice his son but was told by God to kill an animal instead, the celebrations symbolise Ibrahim’s devotion to Allah.

When is it?

The timing of Eid al-Adha is dictated by the lunar cycle so, it falls on a different date.

The day is set when a new moon is spotted – but there is little agreement within the faith about whether the moon must be spotted with the naked eye or if it should be seen in the country where the celebrations are occurring.

Eid al-Adha

Saudi Arabia announced on Friday it would celebrate the festival on the 12 September.

The Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha will be celebrated on September 12 in Saudi Arabia and in most other countries, and on September 13 in Pakistan and Bangladesh.

The public holiday breaks for Eid have also been officially announced:

- Saudi Arabia: 12-day holiday break, which will include the days of the Hajj pilgrimage.

- ِGulf Arab countries of Qatar, the UAE, Kuwait, Oman: nine-day public holiday from Friday, September 9 until Saturday, September 17.

- Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, and Sudan also announced a nine-day public holiday on the same dates as in the Gulf.

- Turkey: nine-day public holiday from Saturday, September 10 until Sunday, September 18.

- Bangladesh: six-day Eid holiday, from Friday September 9 until Wednesday, September 14.

- Tunisia, Morocco and Nigeria: four-day long weekend holiday, from Saturday, September 10 until Tuesday, September 13.

- Pakistan: three-day holiday from Monday, September 12 until Wednesday, September 14.

- Philippines, Indonesia, Singapore, and Ghana: three-day long weekend holiday, from Saturday, September 10 until Monday, September 12.

Local Names For Eid al Adha

The Eid al-Adha festival, or Feast of Sacrifice, is locally also known as:

- Eidul Adha, as spelled in the Philippines legislation.

- Eid el-Kabir, as commonly referred to in Nigeria and Morocco.

- Eid ul Azha, as referred to in Pakistan.

- Kurban Bayrami, as referred to in Turkey.

- Hari Raya Haji, as known in Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore.

- Bakr-Id or Qurbani Eid, as referred to in the Urdu langauge, in India and in Bangladesh.

 

 

READING THE HOLY QUR’AN – MANNERS

MANNERS WHEN READING THE QUR’AN

MANNERS OF THE HEART

A. UNDERSTANDING OF THE ORIGIN OF THE WORDS

This is an indication to the greatness of the words being read, and the bounty of Allah; Glorified is He, to His creation when He addressed His creation with these words.

B. PUTTING INTO THE HEART THE UNDERSTANDING THAT THESE ARE NOT THE WORDS OF MAN.

Through this the reader should think about the characteristics of Allah the Exalted.

C. PRESENCE OF THE HEART WHILE READING.

Through this the reader should throw away other thoughts while reading the Qur’an.

D. PONDERING THE MEANING.

There is less reward in reciting the Qur’an without understanding the meaning. The Qur’an was revealed for guidance and this can be achieved through recitation accompanied with pondering.

E. UNDERSTANDING THE MEANING.

This means interacting and reacting to every verse according to what is proper for it.

F. INDIVIDUALIZATION

This means that the reader feels that every message in the Qur’an is meant especially for him personally.

EXTERNAL MANNERS FOR READING THE QUR’AN

Purity of body and clothes and place.
Using sawak.
Facing the Qiblah.
Seeking refuge from rejected Satan and reading the basmalah.
Not reading when yawning.
Avoiding cutting off reading to talk with people.
Stopping at a verse of warning and seeking protection with Allah, and stopping at a verse of mercy and asking The Merciful for His Bounty.
Humbleness and crying when reading.
Imam An-Nawwawi may Allah be Merciful to him said: Crying when reading the Qur’an is a characteristic of those who know Allah (know Him through His names and Characteristics) and the feelings of the righteous.

Entries for Dubai International Holy Quran Award

20 March 2013

The Dubai International Holy Quran Award has invited entries for participation in the seventh session of the Most Beautiful Recitation Contest, which is part of the 11-category award.

Head of the organising committee Ibrahim Bu Melha, who is also adviser to the Ruler of Dubai for Cultural and Humanitarian Affairs, said the five-category tuneful recitation competition is aimed to discover, sponsor and qualify Quran talents and tuneful voices.

The application forms are available online at the Dubai International Holy Quran Award website, or may be collected in person from the award head office in Al Twar shopping centre of Al Qusais area-2. The deadline for submitting applications is April 18.

Initial tests are slated to start on May 5 while final tests will be held from May 18 to 22.

news@khaleejtimes.com

Hope Conference; Islam is not what you think – Scotland

Attracting audience from around Scotland, Muslim leaders have organized a conference to correct misconceptions about their faith, and break down barriers with followers of other faiths.

“We wanted to provide a social space, a family-friendly venue, for people of all religions to meet and have free discussions,” Zahid Ali, a spokesman for the group organizing the event, Vision Islam, told The Scotsman on Monday, March 18.

 

Attracting Muslims and non-Muslims from Edinburgh, Glasgow and Dundee, the conference was held to tie in with the end of Islam Awareness Week.

“The problem we have is this – there are people who have a view of what Islam is, but most people don’t interact with Muslims, and if they do it is generally in a shop, so they don’t have a chance to interact on a social level and exchange views.”

Themed “Hope Conference; Islam is not what you think”, the event was designed to bring Muslims and non-Muslims together to break down barriers.

Held at Edinburgh’s Corn Exchange on Sunday, it attracted more than 800 people to discuss all aspects of the religion.

Attendants were also invited to listen to a host of high-profile Muslim speakers including Yvonne Ridley from Britain, Yusuf Estes and Kamal El Mekki from the United States and others.

“This particular event was designed to be a really positive day – to bring people from all faiths together to share their thoughts on Islam,” Ali said.

Attracting Muslims and non-Muslims from Edinburgh, Glasgow and Dundee, the conference was held to tie in with the end of Islam Awareness Week.

It included scores of exhibition boards and stalls about Islam.

The event also hosted a series of lectures tackling topics such as “Islam a Religion of Peace & Hope”, “Islam misunderstood: media’s role” and “Are Women Oppressed in Islam”.

Scotland is home to more than 500,000 Muslims, making up less than one percent of the population.

Muslims are the second largest religious group in the country, which has thirty mosques.

Challenges

Encouraging dialogue with the wider society, the conference has offered Muslims a chance to dispel misconceptions about their faith.

“There is this family side to Islam where we are all interacting and sharing ideas – then there is the darker side of politics and the rise of attacks against Muslim women, against Mosques and the rise of Islamophobia,” Ali said.

The spokesman said Muslims were caught in the middle of far-right radicals and Islamophobes.

“We are caught in a very difficult place,” he added.

“At one end we have been hijacked by radical fundamentalists and on the other side we are being targeted by people who think all Muslims are extremist.

“This is 
always something that is simmering under the surface – an anti-Muslim sentiment – especially in tough economic times.

“In challenging economies, as we have seen throughout history, Nazi right-wing groups rise up. However, we are aware of this, which is why it is so important to get people talking, and break down barriers,” he said.

Ali noted that though Scottish Independence has divided the society, he saw it as a benefit for the Muslim community.

“Like any community there are people on both sides of the argument. My personal feeling is that if we had an independent Scotland then it would be easier to enact some law to protect religious minorities,” he said.

“There is of course the law again bigotry which we think is heading down the right religious lines – and we’ve had some positive noises from the Scottish Government.”

Bringing hope of a better understanding in Scottish society, the Muslim event won plaudits from Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill, who visited the conference.

“Events like these can help to dispel ignorance,” MacAskill said.

“They can help contribute to the process of dismantling damaging and excluding stereotypes and reduce misunderstanding or misrepresentation.”

Islam Awareness Week Glasgow, Scotland

“We all drink Irn Bru and support Andy Murray. We’re all Scottish. The idea is to bring Scotland together with the things we have in common, rather than highlight our differences.”

Amjid Bashir is a Muslim businessman from Glasgow and is one of hundreds of volunteers behind this year’s Islam Awareness Week (IAW.)

Humza Yousaf: Islamic tartan celebrates Scottish Muslim cultureAzeem Ibrahim

Taking time from his busy job as co-owner of the city’s Newsbox newsagents, Amjid and fellow members of the Muslim community are doing their utmost to break down negative images of Islam and welcome non-Muslims to learn about their religion.

“The whole idea is that much like Glasgow City Council has their ‘Open Doors’ for a week, where they open their doors for the public to have a look around, it’s similar to that,” said Amjid of IAW.

“In recent years Islam has had a bad image in the media in general and this is a way to readdress that.”

From March 11 to 17, IAW gives Glasgow the chance to gain a deeper understanding of Islam and celebrate Scots identity.

This year’s theme is ‘Things We Have In Common – Scottish Islam’ and sees the largest collaboration between Muslims and non-Muslims in the event’s history.

Volunteers have arranged events with non-Muslim organisations to discuss what issues affect Muslim and non-Muslim families, in order to highlight the problems that every household has in common, regardless of its faith.

“Everyone involved has given up a lot of their time to give back to their community,” said Amjid.

“Doctors, taxi drivers, teachers are all involved and the age group varies. There’s an 11-year-old girl doing something for the launch, and in one meeting the guy sitting next to me was 70.

“The beauty of it is that people get to work with each other and get involved.”

IAW Activities include the exploration of art, photography and social issues relating to Islamic culture. A special Islamic tartan, recently modelled in London by prominent Scottish Muslim MSP Humza Yousaf, will also be showcased throughout IAW.

Groups of school children are invited to receive tours of the Central Mosque and pre-school children are able to attend an arts and crafts session at the Scotland Street Museum.

“Glasgow Muslims have a strong Muslim identity, but also a strong Scottish identity,” said Amjid.

“We’re Muslim and we’re Scottish. The Scots identity is very strong and Muslims are very proud of that.

“Young people are proud to be Scottish, and I’m proud that they’re proud to be Scottish.”

The Islamic Society of Britain founded Islam Awareness Week in 1994, to contradict misconceptions surrounding Britain’s second largest faith group.

Scotland has its own version, run across Glasgow, Inverness and Edinburgh, that’s tailor made especially for Scots.

Speaking on inter-faith relations in his home city, Amjid said: “Glasgow is better than most cities, but a lot more interaction has to happen.

“Sometimes there’s a very negative image of Islam, but things like this tell you what Islam is all about.

“Through initiatives like this we can make things better.”

The week of events will culminate in a highly anticipated gala dinner and hijab fashion show.

‘Rocking on Heaven’s Door: From Gok Wan to Islam’, held at The River Palace Banqueting Hall on Saturday 16, will showcase a variety of stunning hijab styles, highlighting the booming fashion industry behind Muslim clothing.

The gala dinner, entitled ‘Weaving the Tartan – Celebrating Scottish Islam’, welcomes members of the public and the Muslim community to come together for a three-course meal, a tour of Glasgow Central Mosque and an open discussion about Islam.

“Ordinary people from all walks of life sit together and dispel myths about Islam,” said Amjid of the gala dinner.

“It’s a good way of letting their hair down and getting to know each other.”

Those interested in attending the gala dinner on Friday, March 15, must register via the IAW event site.

International Quran Reading Competition

The International Quran Reading Competition or Tilawah Al-Quran is the international Islamic Quran reading event that is held annually since 1961 in Malaysia.

History

Tunku Abdul Rahman (first Malaysian premier) was a founder of the International Quran Reading Competition. The program was started on 9 March 1961 at Stadium Merdeka, Kuala Lumpur and 7 countries took part in this competition including Singapore, Brunei, Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia, Sarawak and Malaya. On 1985 the competition was moved to the Putra World Trade Centre.