Quran Focus Academy Blog

Islamic or Muslim Educational Organization/ Schools In Sweden

Al-Azhar AB

Elementary school in Stockholm, Sweden
Kirunagatan 22-28, 162 68 Vällingby, Sweden.

 

Cordoba International School

Preparatory school in Stockholm, Sweden
Kottbygatan 7, 164 75 Kista, Sweden.

 

Stiftelsen Islamiska skolan

Religious school in Stockholm, Sweden
Fagerstagatan 11, 163 53 Spånga, Sweden.

 

Ibn rushd studieförbund

The organization gives courses in Dawah. Together with Muslim Youth of Sweden, Ibn Rushd organizes the annual event Muslimska Familjedagarna.

 

Al-Salamskolan

Al-Salamskolan is a charter school in Örebro. Beyond the national curriculum, the pupils learn about Islam and Arabic.

 

Shab-e-Miraj (Isra Night) or Lailat al Miraj

Shab-e-Miraj or Isra Night observed in the Holy Month of Rajab by Muslims all over the world. Every year on the night of 26th of Rajab according to the Islamic calendar, Muslims observe Shab-e-Miraj (Isra Night) in which the Holy Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) went on a special journey to meet the Creator of this Universe Allah Almighty, crossing seven skies on the heavenly animal named ‘Al-Buraq.’ The Isra Night is also mentioned in Holy Quran in these words: “Exalted is He who took His Servant by night from al-Masjid al-Haram to al-Masjid al- Aqsa, whose surroundings We have blessed, to show him of Our signs. Indeed, He is the Hearing, the Seeing.” (Quran, 17:1) 

 

Mi’raj (Ascension) and Isra’ (Night Journey). According to most traditions – and especially the authentic ones – this event took place one year before Hijrah. Detailed reports about it are found in the works of Hadith and Sirah and have been narrated from as many as twenty-five Companions. The most exhaustive reports are those from Anas ibn Malik, Malik ibn Sa’sa’ah, Abu Dharr al-Ghifari and Abu Hurayrah. Some other details have been narrated by ‘Umar, ‘Ali, ‘Abd Allah ibn Mas’ud, ‘Abd Allah ibn Abbas, Abu Sa’id al-Khudri, Hudhayfah ibn al-Yaman, and ‘A’ishah among other Companions of the Prophet .

The Quran here only mentions that the Prophet  was taken from the Ka’bah to the mosque in Jerusalem, and specifies that the purpose of the journey was such that God might “show him some of His signs”. Beyond this, The Quran does not concern itself with any detail. However, according to Hadith reports, Gabriel took the Prophet  at night from the Ka’bah to the mosque in Jerusalem on a buraq.* On reaching Jerusalem the Prophet  along with other Prophets offered Prayers.(Al-Nasa’i, SunanK. al-Salah, ‘Bab Fard al-Salah wa Dhikr Ikhtilaf al-Naqilin…’ -Ed.)Gabriel then took him to the heavens and the Prophet  met several great Prophets in different heavenly spheres. (See al-Nasa’i, Sunan, K. al-Salah, ‘Bab Fard al-Salah’ - Ed.) Finally, he reached the highest point in the heavens and was graced with an experience of the Divine Presence. On that occasion the Prophet received a number of directives including that Prayers were obligatory five times a day. (Al-Bukhari, K. Manaqib al -Ansar, ‘Bab al-Mi’raj ; K. al-Tawhid, ‘Bab Kallama Musa Taklima‘ – Ed.) Thereafter, the Prophet  returned from the heavens to Jerusalem, and from there to the Holy Mosque in Makka. Numerous reports on the subject reveal that the Prophet  was also enabled on this occasion to observe Heaven and Hell. (Al-Bukhari, K. al_Salah, ‘Bab Kayfa Furidat al-Salah fi al-Isra‘ and Ibn Hisham, Sirah, vol. I, p. 404 – Ed.)

It may be recalled that according to authentic reports when the Prophet narrated the incidents of this extraordinary journey the following day to the people in Makka, the unbelievers found the whole narration utterly amusing. (Muslim, K, al-Iman, ‘Bab Dhikr al-Masih ibn Maryam’ - Ed.) In fact, even the faith of some Muslims was shaken because of the highly extraordinary nature of the account.(See Ibn Hisham, Sirah , vol. I, p.398 and al-Qurtubi, comments on verse 1 of the surah - Ed.)

The details of the event provided by the Hadith supplement the Quranic account. There is no reason, however, to reject all this supplementary information on the grounds that it is opposed to the Quran. Nevertheless, if someone is not quite convinced and hence does not accept some of the details concerning the Ascension mentioned in the Hadith as true, he should not be considered an unbeliever. On the contrary, if someone were to clearly deny any part of the account categorically mentioned in the Quran, he would be deemed to have gone beyond the fold of Islam.

What was the nature of this journey? Did it take place when the Prophet  was asleep or when he was awake? Did he actually undertake a journey in the physical sense or did he have a spiritual vision while remaining in his own place? These questions, in our view, have been resolved by the text of the Quran itself. The opening statement: “Holy is He Who carried His servant by night from the Holy Mosque to the farther Mosque… ” (verse 1) itself indicates that it was an extraordinary event which took place by dint of the infinite power of God. For quite obviously, to be able to perceive the kind of things mentioned in connection with the event, either in a dream or by means of intuition, is not so wondrous that it should be prefaced by the statement : “Holy is He Who carried His servant by night…” ; a statement which amounts to proclaiming that God was free from every imperfection and flaw. Such a statement would make absolutely no sense if the purpose of it was merely to affirm that God had the power to enable man to have either visions in the course of a dream, or to receive information intuitively. In our view, the words of the experience or a dream vision, was an actual journey, and the observation in question was a visual observation. All was contingent upon God’s will that truths be revealed to the Prophet  in this fashion.

Hijri Calendar or Islamic Calendar or Muslim Calendar

The Islamic calendar is based on the year prophet Muhammad (PBUH) and his fellow Muslims (known as Sahabah, the Companions) emigrated to Madinah in the year 622 C.E. (Christian Era). The emigration took place after thirteen years of persecutions by the disbelievers of Makkah. By the command of God, the Prophet left the city with his companion Abu Bakr Siddique (R.A.) and escaped a death threat by the disbelievers. The event marks the beginning of a second phase of the Islamic movement. It is the phase when Madinah became the center of an Islamic state.

    The Islamic calendar is lunar. Each month must begin with the evening when the new moon is sightable by the unaided naked eye. Muslims are obligated to sight the crescent in every country. Different countries may begin the year at different days based on their own sightings. The calendar is called Hijri calendar. The Arabic word Hijrah means emigration.

The Islamic calendar contains 12 months that are based on the motion of the moon, and because 12 lunar months is 12 x 29.53=354.36 days, the Islamic calendar is consistently shorter (11 Days) than a solar year, and therefore it shifts with respect to the Gregorian calendar.

The Islamic calendar is the official calendar in countries around the Gulf, especially Saudi Arabia. But other Muslim countries use the Gregorian calendar for civil purposes and turn to the Islamic calendar for religious purposes.

The Names of the months in the Islamic or Hijri Calendar:

  1. Muharram
  2. Safar
  3. Rabiul-Awwal
  4. Rabi-uthani
  5. Jumadi-ul-Awwal
  6. Jumadi-uthani
  7. Rajab
  8. Sha’ban
  9. Ramadan
  10. Shawwal
  11. Dhil-Q’ada
  12. Dhil-Hijja

99 NAMES OF PROPHET MUHAMMAD (Pbuh)

THE LIST OF 99 NAMES OF MUHAMMAD (Pbuh)

#

Arabic

Transliteration

Translation

1
عادل
Aadil
The Justice
2
عالم
Aalim
The Scholar
3
عبدالله
Abdullah
Slave of Allah
4
ابوالقاسم
Abu al Qaasim
The father of Qasim.
5
ابو الطاھر
Abu at Tahir
The father of Tahir.
6
ابوالطیب
Abu at Tayyib
The father of Tayyib.
7
ابو ابراھیم
Abu Ibrahim
The father of Ibrahim.
8
عفو
Afoow
Forgiver.
9
احید
Aheed
He who takes to one side.
10
احمد
Ahmad
Much praised
11
اجیر
Ajeer
He who is rewarded.
12
علم الایمان
Alam ul Eeman
The banner of faith.
13
علم الیقین
Alam ul Yaqeen
The banner of belief.
14
علم الھدیٰ
Alamul Hudaa
Banner of guidance.
15
علیم
Aleem
The Knowledgeable
16
امین
Ameen
The Honest One
17
النجم الثاقب
An Najm-us-Saqib
Shining star.
18
عاقب
Aqib
The Latest
19
عربی
Arabi
The Arabi
20
اول
Awwal
The First
21
عین الغر
Ayn ul Ghurr
The chief of the chosen one.
22
عین النعیم
Ayn un Naeem
The spring of blessing.
23
عزیز
Aziz
The Honoured One
24
بالغ
Baaligh
He who attains the elevated station.
25
بار
Bar
Pious
26
بشیر
Basheer
The Messenger of Good News
27
بیان
Bayan
Obvious words
28
برھان
Burhan
The Evidence
29
بشریٰ
Bushraa
Giver of good tidings.
30
داع
Daa
The Invitor
31
دلیل الخیرات
Daleel ul Khyayraat
To guide to virtue.
32
فاتح
Faateh
The Victor
33
فاضل
Faazil
Virtuous.
34
فصیح اللسان
Faseehul Lisaan
The eloquent of speech.
35
فتاح
Fatah
The Successor, The Opener
36
غنی
Ghani
The Rich
37
غریب
Gharib
The Poor
38
غوث
Ghaus
Succour, listener to complaints.
39
غیث
Ghays
Shower of mercy.
40
غیاث
Ghiyaas
Full of succour.
41
ھاد
Haad
The Leader
42
حبیب الله
Habeebullah
Beloved of Allah.
43
حبیب
Habieb
The Beloved
44
حفی
Hafeey
Very merciful.
45
حافظ
Hafiz
The Guardian
46
حکیم
Hakeem
The Wise
47
حامد
Hamid
The Praiser
48
حمید
Hamied
The Thankful
49
حق
Haq
The True, The Truth
50
حریص علیکم
Harees-un-Alaikum
The Covetous for the Believers
51
ھاشم
Hashim
The Destroyer, The Crusher of Evil
52
حاشر
Hashir
The Awakener, The Gatherer
53
ھاشمے
Hashmi
The Hashmi
54
ھدیه الله
Hidayatullah
Gift of Allah.
55
حجازی
Hijazi
The Hijazi
56
حزب الله
Hizbullah
Army of Allah.
57
ھدی
Hudaa
Guide.
58
حجه
Hujjat
The Right Argument
59
اکلیل
Ikleel
Chief (of Prophets)
60
امام
Imam
The Guide
61
امام المتقین
Imamul Muttaqeen
Leader of the pious.
62
عزالعرب
Izzul Arab
The honour of Arabs.
63
جامع
Jaami
Perfect.
64
جبار
Jabbar
Dominant.
65
جواد
Jawwad
The Generous
66
کاف
Kaaf
Sufficient, enough.
67
کامل
Kaamil
Perfect.
68
کاشف الکرب
Kaashiful Kurab
He who solves difficulties.
69
کفیل
Kafeel
Surety.
70
کلیم الله
Kaleemullah
Who converses with Allah.
71
کریم
Kareem
The Noble
72
خلیل الرحمٰن
Khaleel ur Rahman
The freind of Compassionate.
73
خلیل
Khalil
The True Friend
74
خاتم الانبیآء
Khatamul anbiya
Seal of the Prophets.
75
خاتم الرسل
Khatamur Rusul
Seal of Messengers.
76
خطیب الامم
Khateebul Umam
Sermoniser for the people.
77
خطیب
Khatieb
The Sermoniser
78
خاتم
Khatim
The Finalizer
79
ماح
Maah
The obliterator of Infidelity
80
مدنی
Madani
The Resident of Madina
81
مدعو
Madoow
Who is called.
82
مھد
Mahd
The Guided One
83
مھدی
Mahdee
Who is guided.
84
مھدی
Mahdiy
He Who is Well Guided
85
محمود
Mahmood
The Commendable
86
مکین
Makeen
Who is given Rank
87
مکین
Makeen
Who is given rank.
88
مخصوص بالعز
Makhsoos bil Izz
Chosen to be honoured.
89
مخصوص بالمجد
Makhsoos bil Majd
Chosen to be on the right path.
90
مخصوص بالشرف
Makhsoos bil Sharaf
Picked up as a noble.
91
معلوم
Maloom
Known.
92
مامون
Mamoon
Secure.
93
منصور
Mansoor
Who is helped
94
معراج
Maraj
The Place of Ascent, The Above
95
مشھود
Mashhood
He who is witnessed.
96
مشکور
Mashkoor
The Thankful
97
متین
Mateen
The Strong
98
موصول
Mawsool
Having link with Allah.
99
مفتاح
Miftaah
Key to the secrets.

99 Names of Allah or ASMÂ ALLÂH UL HUSNÂ

Allah! there is no god but He! To Him belong the Most Beautiful Names. (Qur’an 20:8)

Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said:
‘To God belongs 99 names, 100 minus 1, anyone who memorizes them will enter Paradise; He (God) is odd (odd number, he is the Only One), and He loves odd numbers (such as 99)’

99 names of Allah list with meanings in English and Arabic.

# Names  Transliteration   Meaning     Explanation
1

الرَّحْمَنُ

Ar-Rahman The Beneficent He who wills goodness and mercy for all His creatures
2

الرَّحِيمُ

Ar-Raheem The Merciful He who acts with extreme kindness
3

الْمَلِكُ

Al-Malik The Eternal Lord The Sovereign Lord, The One with the complete Dominion, the One Whose Dominion is clear from imperfection
4

الْقُدُّوسُ

Al-Quddus The Most Sacred The One who is pure from any imperfection and clear from children and adversaries
5

السَّلاَمُ

As-Salam The Embodiment of Peace The One who is free from every imperfection.
6

الْمُؤْمِنُ

Al-Mu’min The Infuser of Faith The One who witnessed for Himself that no one is God but Him. And He witnessed for His believers that they are truthful in their belief that no one is God but Him
7

الْمُهَيْمِنُ

Al-Muhaymin The Preserver of Safety The One who witnesses the saying and deeds of His creatures
8

الْعَزِيزُ

Al-Aziz The Mighty One The Strong, The Defeater who is not defeated
9

الْجَبَّارُ

Al-Jabbar The Omnipotent One The One that nothing happens in His Dominion except that which He willed
10

الْمُتَكَبِّرُ

Al-Mutakabbir The Dominant One The One who is clear from the attributes of the creatures and from resembling them.
11

الْخَالِقُ

Al-Khaaliq The Creator The One who brings everything from non-existence to existence
12

الْبَارِئُ

Al-Baari The Evolver The Maker, The Creator who has the Power to turn the entities.
13

الْمُصَوِّرُ

Al-Musawwir The Flawless Shaper The One who forms His creatures in different pictures.
14

الْغَفَّارُ

Al-Ghaffaar The Great Forgiver The Forgiver, The One who forgives the sins of His slaves time and time again.
15

الْقَهَّارُ

Al-Qahhaar The All-Prevailing One The Dominant, The One who has the perfect Power and is not unable over anything.
16

الْوَهَّابُ

Al-Wahhab The Supreme Bestower The One who is Generous in giving plenty without any return. He is everything that benefits whether Halal or Haram.
17

الرَّزَّاقُ

Ar-Razzaq The Total Provider The Sustainer, The Provider.
18

الْفَتَّاحُ

Al-Fattah The Supreme Solver The Opener, The Reliever, The Judge, The One who opens for His slaves the closed worldly and religious matters.
19

اَلْعَلِيْمُ

Al-Alim The All-Knowing One The Knowledgeable; The One nothing is absent from His knowledge
20

الْقَابِضُ

Al-Qaabid The Restricting One The Constrictor, The Withholder, The One who constricts the sustenance by His wisdom and expands and widens it with His Generosity and Mercy.
21

الْبَاسِطُ

Al-Baasit The Extender The Englarger, The One who constricts the sustenance by His wisdom and expands and widens it with His Generosity and Mercy.
22

الْخَافِضُ

Al-Khaafid The Reducer The Abaser, The One who lowers whoever He willed by His Destruction and raises whoever He willed by His Endowment.
23

الرَّافِعُ

Ar-Rafi The Elevating One The Exalter, The Elevator, The One who lowers whoever He willed by His Destruction and raises whoever He willed by His Endowment.
24

الْمُعِزُّ

Al-Mu’izz The Honourer-Bestower He gives esteem to whoever He willed, hence there is no one to degrade Him; And He degrades whoever He willed, hence there is no one to give Him esteem.
25

المُذِلُّ

Al-Muzil The Abaser The Dishonourer, The Humiliator, He gives esteem to whoever He willed, hence there is no one to degrade Him; And He degrades whoever He willed, hence there is no one to give Him esteem.
26

السَّمِيعُ

As-Sami’ The All-Hearer The Hearer, The One who Hears all things that are heard by His Eternal Hearing without an ear, instrument or organ.
27

الْبَصِيرُ

Al-Baseer The All-Seeing The All-Noticing, The One who Sees all things that are seen by His Eternal Seeing without a pupil or any other instrument.
28

الْحَكَمُ

Al-Hakam The Impartial Judge The Judge, He is the Ruler and His judgment is His Word.
29

الْعَدْلُ

Al-Adl The Embodiment of Justice The Just, The One who is entitled to do what He does.
30

اللَّطِيفُ

Al-Lateef The Knower of Subtleties The Subtle One, The Gracious, The One who is kind to His slaves and endows upon them.
31

الْخَبِيرُ

Al-Khabeer The All-Aware One The One who knows the truth of things.
32

الْحَلِيمُ

Al-Haleem The Clement One The Forebearing, The One who delays the punishment for those who deserve it and then He might forgive them.
33

الْعَظِيمُ

Al-Azeem The Magnificent One The Great One, The Mighty, The One deserving the attributes of Exaltment, Glory, Extolement, and Purity from all imperfection.
34

الْغَفُورُ

Al-Ghafoor The Great Forgiver The All-Forgiving, The Forgiving, The One who forgives a lot.
35

الشَّكُورُ

Ash-Shakoor The Acknowledging One The Grateful, The Appreciative, The One who gives a lot of reward for a little obedience.
36

الْعَلِيُّ

Al-Aliyy The Sublime One The Most High, The One who is clear from the attributes of the creatures.
37

الْكَبِيرُ

Al-Kabeer The Great One The Most Great, The Great, The One who is greater than everything in status.
38

الْحَفِيظُ

Al-Hafiz The Guarding One The Preserver, The Protector, The One who protects whatever and whoever He willed to protect.
39

المُقيِت

Al-Muqeet The Sustaining One The Maintainer, The Guardian, The Feeder, The One who has the Power.
40

الْحسِيبُ

Al-Haseeb The Reckoning One The Reckoner, The One who gives the satisfaction.
41

الْجَلِيلُ

Al-Jaleel The Majestic One The Sublime One, The Beneficent, The One who is attributed with greatness of Power and Glory of status.
42

الْكَرِيمُ

Al-Kareem The Bountiful One The Generous One, The Gracious, The One who is attributed with greatness of Power and Glory of status.
43

الرَّقِيبُ

Ar-Raqeeb The Watchful One The Watcher, The One that nothing is absent from Him. Hence it’s meaning is related to the attribute of Knowledge.
44

الْمُجِيبُ

Al-Mujeeb The Responding One The Responsive, The Hearkener, The One who answers the one in need if he asks Him and rescues the yearner if he calls upon Him.
45

الْوَاسِعُ

Al-Waasi’ The All-Pervading One The Vast, The All-Embracing, The Knowledgeable.
46

الْحَكِيمُ

Al-Hakeem The Wise One The Wise, The Judge of Judges, The One who is correct in His doings.
47

الْوَدُودُ

Al-Wadud The Loving One The One who loves His believing slaves and His believing slaves love Him. His love to His slaves is His Will to be merciful to them and praise them
48

الْمَجِيدُ

Al-Majeed The Glorious One The Most Glorious One, The One who is with perfect Power, High Status, Compassion, Generosity and Kindness.
49

الْبَاعِثُ

Al-Ba’ith The Infuser of New Life The Resurrector, The Raiser (from death), The One who resurrects His slaves after death for reward and/or punishment.
50

الشَّهِيدُ

Ash-Shaheed The All Observing Witness The Witness, The One who nothing is absent from Him.
51

الْحَقُّ

Al-Haqq The Embodiment of Truth The Truth, The True, The One who truly exists.
52

الْوَكِيلُ

Al-Wakeel The Universal Trustee The Trustee, The One who gives the satisfaction and is relied upon.
53

الْقَوِيُّ

Al-Qawwiyy The Strong One The Most Strong, The Strong, The One with the complete Power
54

الْمَتِينُ

Al-Mateen The Firm One The One with extreme Power which is un-interrupted and He does not get tired.
55

الْوَلِيُّ

Al-Waliyy The Protecting Associate The Protecting Friend, The Supporter.
56

الْحَمِيدُ

Al-Hameed The Sole-Laudable One The Praiseworthy, The praised One who deserves to be praised.
57

الْمُحْصِي

Al-Muhsee The All-Enumerating One The Counter, The Reckoner, The One who the count of things are known to him.
58

الْمُبْدِئُ

Al-Mubdi The Originator The One who started the human being. That is, He created him.
59

الْمُعِيدُ

Al-Mueed The Restorer The Reproducer, The One who brings back the creatures after death
60

الْمُحْيِي

Al-Muhyi The Maintainer of life The Restorer, The Giver of Life, The One who took out a living human from semen that does not have a soul. He gives life by giving the souls back to the worn out bodies on the resurrection day and He makes the hearts alive by the light of knowledge.
61

اَلْمُمِيتُ

Al-Mumeet The Inflictor of Death The Creator of Death, The Destroyer, The One who renders the living dead.
62

الْحَيُّ

Al-Hayy The Eternally Living One The Alive, The One attributed with a life that is unlike our life and is not that of a combination of soul, flesh or blood.
63

الْقَيُّومُ

Al-Qayyoom The Self-Subsisting One The One who remains and does not end.
64

الْوَاجِدُ

Al-Waajid The Pointing One The Perceiver, The Finder, The Rich who is never poor. Al-Wajd is Richness.
65

الْمَاجِدُ

Al-Maajid The All-Noble One The Glorious, He who is Most Glorious.
66

الْواحِدُ

Al-Waahid The Only One The Unique, The One, The One without a partner
67

اَلاَحَدُ

Al-Ahad The Sole One The One
68

الصَّمَدُ

As-Samad The Supreme Provider The Eternal, The Independent, The Master who is relied upon in matters and reverted to in ones needs.
69

الْقَادِرُ

Al-Qaadir The Omnipotent One The Able, The Capable, The One attributed with Power.
70

الْمُقْتَدِرُ

Al-Muqtadir The All Authoritative One The Powerful, The Dominant, The One with the perfect Power that nothing is withheld from Him.
71

الْمُقَدِّمُ

Al-Muqaddim The Expediting One The Expediter, The Promoter, The One who puts things in their right places. He makes ahead what He wills and delays what He wills.
72

الْمُؤَخِّرُ

Al-Mu’akhkhir The Procrastinator The Delayer, the Retarder, The One who puts things in their right places. He makes ahead what He wills and delays what He wills.
73

الأوَّلُ

Al-Awwal The Very First The First, The One whose Existence is without a beginning.
74

الآخِرُ

Al-Akhir The Infinite Last One The Last, The One whose Existence is without an end.
75

الظَّاهِرُ

Az-Zaahir The Perceptible The Manifest, The One that nothing is above Him and nothing is underneath Him, hence He exists without a place. He, The Exalted, His Existence is obvious by proofs and He is clear from the delusions of attributes of bodies.
76

الْبَاطِنُ

Al-Baatin The Imperceptible The Hidden, The One that nothing is above Him and nothing is underneath Him, hence He exists without a place. He, The Exalted, His Existence is obvious by proofs and He is clear from the delusions of attributes of bodies.
77

الْوَالِي

Al-Waali The Holder of Supreme Authority The Governor, The One who owns things and manages them.
78

الْمُتَعَالِي

Al-Muta’ali The Extremely Exalted One The Most Exalted, The High Exalted, The One who is clear from the attributes of the creation.
79

الْبَرُّ

Al-Barr The Fountain-Head of Truth The Source of All Goodness, The Righteous, The One who is kind to His creatures, who covered them with His sustenance and specified whoever He willed among them by His support, protection, and special mercy.
80

التَّوَابُ

At-Tawwaab The Ever-Acceptor of Repentance The Relenting, The One who grants repentance to whoever He willed among His creatures and accepts his repentance.
81

الْمُنْتَقِمُ

Al-Muntaqim The Retaliator The Avenger, The One who victoriously prevails over His enemies and punishes them for their sins. It may mean the One who destroys them.
82

العَفُوُّ

Al-Afuww The Supreme Pardoner The Forgiver, The One with wide forgiveness.
83

الرَّؤُوفُ

Ar-Ra’oof The Benign One The Compassionate, The One with extreme Mercy. The Mercy of Allah is His will to endow upon whoever He willed among His creatures.
84

مَالِكُ الْمُلْكِ

Maalik-ul-Mulk The Eternal Possessor of Sovereignty The One who controls the Dominion and gives dominion to whoever He willed.
85

ذُوالْجَلاَلِ وَالإكْرَامِ

Zul-Jalaali-wal-Ikram The Possessor of Majesty and Honour The Lord of Majesty and Bounty, The One who deserves to be Exalted and not denied.
86

الْمُقْسِطُ

Al-Muqsit The Just One The Equitable, The One who is Just in His judgment.
87

الْجَامِعُ

Al-Jaami’ The Assembler of Scattered Creations The Gatherer, The One who gathers the creatures on a day that there is no doubt about, that is the Day of Judgment.
88

الْغَنِيُّ

Al-Ghaniyy The Self-Sufficient One The One who does not need the creation.
89

الْمُغْنِي

Al-Mughni The Bestower of Sufficiency The Enricher, The One who satisfies the necessities of the creatures.
90

اَلْمَانِعُ

Al-Maani’ The Preventer The Withholder.
91

الضَّارَّ

Ad-Daarr The Distressor The One who makes harm reach to whoever He willed and benefit to whoever He willed.
92

النَّافِعُ

An-Naafi’ The Bestower of Benefits The Propitious, The One who makes harm reach to whoever He willed and benefit to whoever He willed.
93

النُّورُ

An-Noor The Prime Light The Light, The One who guides.
94

الْهَادِي

Al-Haadi The Provider of Guidance The Guide, The One whom with His Guidance His believers were guided, and with His Guidance the living beings have been guided to what is beneficial for them and protected from what is harmful to them.
95

الْبَدِيعُ

Al-Badi’ The Unique One The Incomparable, The One who created the creation and formed it without any preceding example.
96

اَلْبَاقِي

Al-Baaqi The Ever Surviving One The Everlasting, The One that the state of non-existence is impossible for Him.
97

الْوَارِثُ

Al-Waaris The Eternal Inheritor The Heir, The One whose Existence remains.
98

الرَّشِيدُ

Ar-Rasheed The Guide to Path of Rectitude The Guide to the Right Path, The One who guides.
99

الصَّبُورُ

As-Saboor The Extensively Enduring One The Patient, The One who does not quickly punish the sinners.

 

When is Eid al Adha this year?

Eid al-Adha is the holiest celebration in the Islamic calendar and this year it falls on September 12, in most countries.

The name Eid al-Adha translates as the “festival of the sacrifice” or Bakr Eid and is also known as the “Greater Eid”.

The celebration marks the end of Hajj, the annual Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca which thousands of Muslims all over the world embark on.

It is different from Eid al-Fitr – which is the festival that comes immediately after Ramadan.

During Eid al-Adha, Muslims honour the day Prophet Ibrahim was about to sacrifice his son but was told by God to kill an animal instead, the celebrations symbolise Ibrahim’s devotion to Allah.

When is it?

The timing of Eid al-Adha is dictated by the lunar cycle so, it falls on a different date.

The day is set when a new moon is spotted – but there is little agreement within the faith about whether the moon must be spotted with the naked eye or if it should be seen in the country where the celebrations are occurring.

Eid al-Adha

Saudi Arabia announced on Friday it would celebrate the festival on the 12 September.

The Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha will be celebrated on September 12 in Saudi Arabia and in most other countries, and on September 13 in Pakistan and Bangladesh.

The public holiday breaks for Eid have also been officially announced:

- Saudi Arabia: 12-day holiday break, which will include the days of the Hajj pilgrimage.

- ِGulf Arab countries of Qatar, the UAE, Kuwait, Oman: nine-day public holiday from Friday, September 9 until Saturday, September 17.

- Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, and Sudan also announced a nine-day public holiday on the same dates as in the Gulf.

- Turkey: nine-day public holiday from Saturday, September 10 until Sunday, September 18.

- Bangladesh: six-day Eid holiday, from Friday September 9 until Wednesday, September 14.

- Tunisia, Morocco and Nigeria: four-day long weekend holiday, from Saturday, September 10 until Tuesday, September 13.

- Pakistan: three-day holiday from Monday, September 12 until Wednesday, September 14.

- Philippines, Indonesia, Singapore, and Ghana: three-day long weekend holiday, from Saturday, September 10 until Monday, September 12.

Local Names For Eid al Adha

The Eid al-Adha festival, or Feast of Sacrifice, is locally also known as:

- Eidul Adha, as spelled in the Philippines legislation.

- Eid el-Kabir, as commonly referred to in Nigeria and Morocco.

- Eid ul Azha, as referred to in Pakistan.

- Kurban Bayrami, as referred to in Turkey.

- Hari Raya Haji, as known in Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore.

- Bakr-Id or Qurbani Eid, as referred to in the Urdu langauge, in India and in Bangladesh.

 

 

READING THE HOLY QUR’AN – MANNERS

MANNERS WHEN READING THE QUR’AN

MANNERS OF THE HEART

A. UNDERSTANDING OF THE ORIGIN OF THE WORDS

This is an indication to the greatness of the words being read, and the bounty of Allah; Glorified is He, to His creation when He addressed His creation with these words.

B. PUTTING INTO THE HEART THE UNDERSTANDING THAT THESE ARE NOT THE WORDS OF MAN.

Through this the reader should think about the characteristics of Allah the Exalted.

C. PRESENCE OF THE HEART WHILE READING.

Through this the reader should throw away other thoughts while reading the Qur’an.

D. PONDERING THE MEANING.

There is less reward in reciting the Qur’an without understanding the meaning. The Qur’an was revealed for guidance and this can be achieved through recitation accompanied with pondering.

E. UNDERSTANDING THE MEANING.

This means interacting and reacting to every verse according to what is proper for it.

F. INDIVIDUALIZATION

This means that the reader feels that every message in the Qur’an is meant especially for him personally.

EXTERNAL MANNERS FOR READING THE QUR’AN

Purity of body and clothes and place.
Using sawak.
Facing the Qiblah.
Seeking refuge from rejected Satan and reading the basmalah.
Not reading when yawning.
Avoiding cutting off reading to talk with people.
Stopping at a verse of warning and seeking protection with Allah, and stopping at a verse of mercy and asking The Merciful for His Bounty.
Humbleness and crying when reading.
Imam An-Nawwawi may Allah be Merciful to him said: Crying when reading the Qur’an is a characteristic of those who know Allah (know Him through His names and Characteristics) and the feelings of the righteous.

Muslim Kids & Islamic Homeschooling in USA

Columbia — On Monday afternoons, the halls of Dar al Taqwa Islamic Center are filled with voices of excited children, playing tag with siblings and friends, showing off snow globe art projects. A cluster of 20 mothers meet in the multipurpose room, tending toddlers and babies, chatting, and readying lunch, forming the Al-Ansar Homeschooling Cooperative, based on a consensus model where every member participates by volunteering to teach or clean up, essentially ‘pulling their weight.’ They settle down to listen to Elizabeth, a founding member, give a talk on classroom management.

Muslim_homeschool

Muslim Homeschool

In one room, Asmaa El-Haggan, mother of a ten year old son, teaches Model U.N Debate class. Seven weeks of classes are taught by mothers divided by age on topics of interest to the group or based on her expertise. By pooling money together, they recently had a nutritionist teach a class on healthy food choices. They hold an annual Art Fair and a Science Fair, and even hand out certificates. There are no charges except minor material fees for supplies.

Tips are shared: ‘get an educator’s card at the library and you can get six weeks to check out books’, ‘present your portfolio for review in a binder and show them your daily schedule’, ‘I use lyrical recitation of Quran and that passes for the music requirement.’ It’s a close knit, egalitarian group supporting each other in Islam and in their homeschooling journeys.

Driving in once a week from as far as Frederick, Silver Springs, Laurel to Ellicott City to give their children a taste of the classroom, Al Ansar moms are also active in arranging educational field trips for the 100 homeschooling families on their email listserv. They covered the Medical Museum, Owens Science Center, the Newseum, Ladew Garden, and a glass blowing factory last session. The next trips planned are to NASA and the U.S. Capitol.

“The DC area is great for free activities,” says one mother. The cultural and historical offerings are so rich, many homeschooling families rely heavily on the city’s cultural institutions, landmarks, museums, libraries and historical sites. The Maryland Science Center offered homeschool programming in the month of January. Maryland History Society has educational tours.

On Tuesdays, Heidi Wahba’s kids take a history class at the Sandy Spring Museum in Olney. On Wednesdays, they intern with Bryant County Critters in Gaithersburg assisting the instructor. Group study on Thursdays, and the week is finished off with a debate class with friends at the Makkah Learning Center in Gambrills. “I spend a lot of time in the car,” she says, driving her four children all over the state from their home in Brookville. It’s worth it to her. Her son was bullied ‘too much” in school, so she discussed it with a few Muslim friends, bought her first book called “Teach Your Own: John Bolt’s Book of Homeschooling”, joined 3-4 homeschooler listservs and never looked back. Building a solid foundation of Islamic beliefs is worth every minute to her. “My kids don’t follow the crowd.”

Zahirah Eppard and Moira McGuire are pros; they are grandmothers and have homeschooled several children between the two of them.

McGuire recommends that families new to homeschooling do it for more than a year. “A year is just not enough time as you need to adjust your ideas about education or your child[ren] needs to adjust theirs”. Skeptical of ‘traditional’ schooling, which she says isn’t traditional at all, she found herself unschooling, a self-directed approach to education. “In the beginning, I didn’t understand that I am an unschooler,” says McGuire. Her husband had a different, more planned approach. They have learned how to balance their approaches to their childrens’ education. She thinks for parents new to the idea, especially those who are pulling their children out from schools, need to know that a year is spent struggling with the question, ‘am I doing the right thing?’

Some choose to homeschool because they see a lot of time wasted in public schools and feel that their children can complete the 12 year curriculum at an accelerated pace. Creativity and flexibility are priorities for some and others want to build a solid Islamic identity. Currently more than 1.5 million children homeschool in the United States. According to the Maryland State Department of Education, Maryland’s homeschool enrollment nearly doubled over the past 15 years.

Hifdz of the Quran is a major reason why many families choose to homeschool. Without the pressure of public or private schools structured curriculum, Hifdh students tend to complete their memorization quicker. Husna Hamza has three daughters who are completing their hifdh at The Hifz School at Dar us Salaam; she homeschools her daughters and her three younger sons.

When Hamza’s girls were attending private school, she felt their relationship was more about their schooling and less about mothering — the boss-employee routine — ordering them around from the minute the day started to adhere to someone else’s schedule. Now she focuses on teaching her six children life skills and likes that she is not bound by a curriculum or artificial structure. “Home is the best, I don’t think young children should be away from home for such long periods of time,” she shares. She feels it is important for the health of the family – for bonding with parents and siblings.

Maryland is an active hub for homeschoolers, but is relatively homeschool unfriendly at the governmental level. Many states such as California and Pennsylvania provide resources, curriculums, let homeschoolers borrow books from the public school system, allow homeschoolers to take some classes in public high schools, give access to many public school extracurricular activities (sports, clubs, etc.). Some states provide public schooling at home by sending district teachers to the house. The District of Columbia pays for virtual homeschool programs such as K-12.com. The only resource that Maryland provides is that the homeschooled student may sit for standardized state testing.

But this didn’t stop Andini Gallivan family’s homeschooling journey which started when her daughter was also bullied in school. Her mother fell ill overseas and she took her two daughters with her to Indonesia for an extended stay. Her husband, a private school teacher, was intially opposed to the idea, but when he saw the progress the girls made under Andini’s tutelage he acceded. He is an active participant in their education and wants their daughters to home school through college.

They likes structure and have organized their Gallivan Academy to suit the family’s schedule and her daughter’s learning styles. These days the girls are studying the Khulafa Rashideen in History. She helps run a Muslim Homeschooling page on Facebook, which frequently offers tips and articles. The family moved from Virginia and finds more Muslim homeschooling families in Maryland. They do miss the resources in Virginia and the fact that Virginia doesn’t require portfolio reviews or reporting, but revel in the company.

Nahiya Saeed says seeing your child learn how to read and knowing that it was a result of your hard work is so rewarding. Participants use many different methods, ”different strokes for different folks”, says Saeed who attended public school. She has taught in the school system and feels the system is overworked with 30 students in a class room. “I don’t think homeschooled kids are smarter, but they tend to be more patient, less frustrated and less stressed as they receive a safe, tailor-made education.”

Home education is governed by COMAR 13A.10.01 in Maryland, a procedure used by the superintendent of each local school system to determine if a child participating in a home instruction program is receiving regular, thorough instruction during the school year in subjects usually taught in the public schools to children of the same age. Each school district has different requirements.

Under COMAR, students must be taught by parents or guardians but they can also hire tutors for subjects. Parents do not need to be certified. Learning the law is very important, parents are not required to teach the same information that the public schools teach.

Local school district personnel are not always familiar with the details of the laws, and a spirited discussion ensues as the Al-Ansar moms reveal their review experiences where they were asked questions that were clearly illegal. Dannette Zaghari-Mask, an attorney, says that sometimes the county asks to see everyone.“They are not allowed to interview the kids,” she says. Saeed nods her head in agreement; she is a member of the panel which runs the co-op. Mervad Sewilan comments that some reviewers ‘look at us as an enemy.’ Gallivan shares how she used her review as an opportunity for dawah.

Saeed says Al-Ansar is not an umbrella group, so it can not do the reviews for its parents, but the interest is there. Dar Al Taqwa has the required paperwork.

If a parent or guardian decides to homeschool, they have 15 days before the beginning of a home instruction program to sign a written statement on a form prescribed by the State Department of Education. In Maryland, English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Art, Music, Health, and Physical Education are mandatory subjects. Quranic recitation classes can be substituted for Music classes.

Some school districts have cooked up forms and policies that are not legally required, warns Homeschool Legal Defense Association (HSLDA). The correct form—the one developed by the state Department of Education—is available on the HSLDA webpage for Maryland. HSLDA urges families to use this form rather than the one the county offers. Families are not required to file any forms with the local public school; a notification of intent is enough to inform the school superintendent.

Diana, a mother of six, sits outside a church, on a cold January day, with several other mothers clad in hijabs. Her daughter is inside attending an advanced science class in the church’s basement, that they found through a Christian message board. “I wish masajid [Islamic Centers] would open up their doors for homeschoolers to host classes.” Her experience requesting rooms at the Islamic Center near her home met ‘a lot of resistance and barriers’. Families can easily band together and hire tutors for private lessons cutting down the cost for a single family and provide income for retired teachers and professionals in the community.

McGuire, a thrifty mother of six, says it is not her journey, it is her children’s journey. Her son, Zakaria asked her to homeschool in first grade, he is now 16 and taking two classes at Howard County Community College; $250 each a semester. She also unschools three younger children – reusing books and equipment. Homeschooling can be cheap if used textbooks are bought through eBay and homeschooling swap meets. Community college credits for advanced coursework can later be applied toward a degree, saving money in the long run.

Homeschooling can be expensive as well. Classes with private tutors, correspondence classes and curriculum such as Calvert can add up fast. A full 4-year, 18 unit high school diploma program with American School online costs $2100. Diana of Columbia, MD, spends at least a couple of thousand dollars, ‘plus pay[s] taxes’. Heidi has a budget of $2000-2500 for her children, which she finds cheaper than private school.

With two kids now in highschool McGuire feels the pinch, spending $500 a year per child per class. “I find the older I get and the older my kids get, the less involved I am; they are experiencing life,” says McGuire. ‘Subcontracting’ as she calls it, means having other people involved with her kids, “that is what is different about [homeschooling] high schoolers.”

A tax credit bill SB 271 has been submitted to the Maryland Senate. It will help all families who choose non-public education—both homeschool families and private school families. According to the Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA) If enacted, homeschooling families can obtain a $1,000 tax credit for books, tuition, correspondence courses etc. Some homeschoolers see the bill as intrusive and oppose it. They fear stricter oversight.

Another concern for parents who want to homeschool through high school is college preparedness. They are unsure if they have what it takes to teach high school level concepts. Diana tortured herself over this issue. Her eldest has now graduated from UMBC. “She loved the place,” says Diana.

In 2002, the College Board, which administers the SAT, says that homeschoolers averaged 72 points, or 7 percent, higher than the national average. At a portfolio review in Greenbelt Library, the school district reviewer shared samples of transcripts kept by homeschooling mothers of high schoolers. “Some universities are more friendly than others,” she says and college board results, extracurricular activities, recommendations from community college professors as well as showing what the student has done with their life helps homeschoolers get into prestigious colleges. According to the New York Magazine, based on a study that compared students at a midwestern university from 2004 to 2009, students coming from a home school graduated college within four years at a higher rate than their peers—66.7 percent compared with 57.5 percent—and earned higher grade-point averages.

What about the kids? What do they think? Dalya, an eighth grader from Germantown decided to homeschool herself. The language at school, the aggression and bullying were too much for her. “I want to homeschool my own kids; schools are a bad influence,” she says with a grin. However, she is headed back to the local high school because that is what all her siblings did.

Safiyyah is a quiet eight year old, whose favorite subject is math. Homeschooled since she was in kindergarten, she shyly says, “I like being home,” her brown eyes looking down at the floor.” I like spending time with my mommy.” Her mommy, Kimberly Baqqi, the cheerful administrator of the Al-Ansar Co-op email list coos with delight. Validation feels good.

Nadia, Sakinah and Aisha are ninth graders having lunch in between sessions at the co-op. After being homeschooled by their mothers since they were in elementary school, they presently take chemistry classes together with a college professor in Adelphi, MD and writing classes in Greenbelt, MD. They find themselves aptly prepared for the classes.

Since socialization skills are a big concern for homeschool critics, this is a question that is often thrown their way. They don’t agree with the stereotype that homeschoolers are introverts. “It allows you to grow in a way that is not possible when people are closed in with [only] their peers,” says Nadia.

Confident that they can take on the world, they know that it is their own journey.

United Kingdom Experience – The Study of Quranic Teaching and Learning

Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, Rome-Italy Mohd Aderi Che Noh, National University of Malaysia Ab. Halim Tamuri, National University of Malaysia Khadijah Abd. Razak, National University of Malaysia Asmawati Suhid, Universiti Putra Malaysia Abstract

Al-Quran is the revelation to Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) started with the word “Iqra’’. Prophet (PBUH) had implemented five principles of al-Quran teaching and learning which his companions and the next generation follow until today. The model consist of Tilawah (good and fluency recitation), Tafahum and Tafsir (knowing and understanding the meaning), Tatbiq (appreciate and implantation of the teaching in daily life), Tahfiz (memorizing some verses for practice and reciting during prayer) and Taranum (reciting al-Quran with a good voice and proper song). In this part of the article, the main areas of discussion will be how the Qur’an is taught in the Muslim community in particular in their mosques, madrasas and community centres and hence their method of teaching and then how it is perceived by the audience i.e. the students, teachers and also parents.

 

 

The study found that the teachers have been using a variety of strategies in implementing quranic teaching and learning, some teaching methods such as conventional and others reflect new methods taking into consideration the different abilities of the children. This style of teaching totally ignores the quality of recitation and teaching with the rules of Tajwid. This article will then lead to a conclusion, which will include some suggestions on how to improve the main curriculum and how the Qur’an should be taught.
1. Introduction Quranic education

is an obligation to every muslims. It is the responsibility of parents and teachers to help new generation in Quranic learning to become true muslim and better human being. Quranic learning started with learning Tajweed, which means learning how to pronounce and recite latter correctly. Tajweed can only be learned with a qualified Quranic teacher. Abdullah Al-Qari (1988) asserts that the al-Quran must be learned from teachers’ i.e by musyafahah and talaqi. Without any proper lessons with the experts, a person will unable to read the Quran properly and smoothly.

 

A teacher who can recite the Quran with fluency and smoothly, and articulating every letter from its articulation point and giving the letter its rights and dues of characteristics will be considered as a model teacher who expert in al-Quran recitation (alGhazali, 1993). This is also consistent with al-Abrasyi (1969), which suggests those who wish to become a teacher of the Qur’an should know the consequences of reading the Quran and knowing the rules of reciting the Qur’an quickly and accurately. They should have sufficient capacity of knowledge to be taught to the students.

 

 

2. The Establishment Of Muslim Education In United Kingdom Toward Quranic Education

 Akbar S. Ahmed eloquently describes this new discovery of the British Muslim, “In a crucial sense they are staring from the beginning…rejecting what their fathers stood for and what their elders spoke of…Each generation must now rediscover Islam for itself” (Akhbar Ahmad, 2001) This brings us to looking at the establishment of Muslim education in the United Kingdom.

In Britain, the establishment of Muslim education commenced during the 1960’s with the ‘Qur’anic School’. This was not an institution by itself but more of supplementary education in the mosques that the first generation of Muslim established for their children. Since the early days, Muslims began to rely on Imams imported from their home countries for religious services and for basic Islamic education for the younger generation.

These lessons for primary and secondary school level pupils were teached by Imams to the pupils in the late afternoon after school hours or during the weekends (P. Lewis, 2002). This effort of education for the Muslims have by now developed into the establishment of voluntary aided madrasas and Muslims faith schools across the United Kingdom, which follow the national curriculum but with Islamic studies, especially the teaching of the Qur’an, incorporated.

The establishment of Muslim faith schools has been very successful since the late 1980’s in the sense that there are currently over 100 independent and seven state-funded Muslim faith schools in the British education system. However, it is important to take note that the majority of Muslim children in the united Kingdom still attend British state schools and that the supplementary education is still the main link for a Muslim pupil to the teaching of the Qur’an.

At this moment it seems that only three percent of the Muslim pupils in Britain attend Muslim faith schools or madrasas (Nasar Meer, 2007). . This is the reason why the supplementary Muslim education and its Qur’anic teaching is the main focus for this study. It is the only way the majority of Muslim children across the United Kingdom can have access to the teaching of the Qur’an.

This supplementary Muslim education utilizes a number of places to impart this knowledge during the weekend or after school hours. It is still common for the Muslim community in the United Kingdom to mainly use the mosque for such teachings, however, if that is not possible then a community centre or a local school is commonly hired for this purpose or the Qur’anic teaching may be imparted within the home of the imam (Peter Mandaville, 2007).

However, this supplementary education has in recent years been highly criticized by both Muslims and nonMuslims for their poorly educated Imams and out dated teaching skills (Martin Van Bruinessen, 2003). It has become very common to hear Muslims in the United Kingdom and in Europe demanding that their Imams should be better educated in the Islamic Sciences and have a better understanding of their respective European society (Amjad Hussain, 2007).

Even though Islamic education in the United Kingdom has evolved successfully over the last forty years especially due to developments with regards the Muslim identity in Britain, it is still the supplementary Muslim education that is vital for the new Muslim generation, born and raised in the United Kingdom. It is therefore important to research the individual experience of how the Qur’an has been taught in these Qur’anic Schools.

 

3. The Method Of Teaching And Learning Quranic Education In United Kingdom

 The Qur’an as Muslims understand it to be the direct speech of God revealed to the Prophet Muhammad through the Archangel Gabriel holds immense importance and status in their lives (Abdullah Saeed, 2008).

Not a single home within any Muslim community will be without it. It is treated with utmost respect and dignity and every effort is made to ensure its sanctity. However, the main purpose of this part of the article is not to delve into the liturgy and virtues of the Qur’an from the Muslim perspective but to highlight how the Qur’an is taught and what methods are used specifically within the Western context and to be more specific within the context of the United Kingdom. Nor is it intended to delve into the different interpretations and sciences of the Qur’anic verses whether they are classical or modern interpretations.

However, what will be highlighted here is a Qur’anic verse, which indicates the purpose of the Qur’an and then investigating and comparing this verse in terms of implementation within the context of the Muslim community. In this part of the article, the main areas of discussion will be how the Qur’an is taught in the Muslim community in particular in their mosques, madrasahs and community centres and hence their method of teaching and then how it is perceived by the audience i.e. the students, teachers and also parents.

This article will then lead to a conclusion, which will include some suggestions on how to improve the main curriculum and how the Qur’an should be taught. It is stated in the Qur’an in Chapter Sad, This is a blessed Scripture, which We have sent to you (Muhammad), so that people may think about its messages.

One does not have to be an exegete to understand and grasp this verse as it simply encapsulates how the Qur’an should be read, understood and practised. Further, to reinforce this position one may argue that the Prophet Muhammad himself followed these instructions and practically demonstrated them to his Companions as he was responsible to teach and clearly explain to his followers the book. Undoubtedly, Muslims read the Qur’an to obtain reward but does that fulfil the purpose, is mere reading sufficient? Or is the main objective defeated, which is to ponder and to implement, as the above verse implies. Over the years however, different methods have been adopted for different age groups and the system and curriculum in mosques etc. has dramatically changed. This is mainly due to the exposure and teaching techniques, which teachers in this field have learnt and adopted from other sources such as government schools.

Government teachers are provided and given different methods of how children can learn and what methods can be adopted. These same teachers then have the possibility to apply these methods in the mosques, which not only makes the session interesting, but more interactive and productive for the child. Categorically, the area of learning and teaching the Qur’an can fall into several categories; the first the mosque itself, secondly a community centre, which is hired out to the local Muslim community; thirdly a local school, fourthly at home or private tuition (Muslim, Sahih Muslim, 1998). In terms of the quantity of students, this will vary according to the population in each community.

 

However, with regards to the teaching methods, we have a fusion of different styles. Some teaching methods are conventional and others reflect new methods taking into consideration the different abilities of the children. As mentioned earlier, this method is very effective and also accommodates the children in their learning in this area of studies. For example, the conventional practice, which I like to use here rather than using the term ‘old’ or ‘traditional’ is a method which was imported from the subcontinent. This method of teaching, it could be argued is in total contradiction to our contemporary context and in addition, it could be further contended, that it is in conflict with the example of the Prophet Muhammad himself.

 

The typical classroom setting in a mosque would be that the students would sit on the floor in front of a bench and the teacher would sit in the front of the class. The teacher would call each student one by one and listen to his reading from the Qur’an and then set him more reading for the next day. Depending on the capability of the teacher, he would rectify the student’s reading with correct pronunciation of each letter (Tajwid) or if he himself was unable to do this, then this would be left to the student’s discretion.

 

However, the example of the Prophet Muhammad is quite different with regards to learning and teaching of the Qur’an. This is very explicitly explained in the Hadith of Sahih Muslim narrated by Ibn c Abbas, which describes the way Gabriel would descend every night in the month of Ramadan. He would then read and teach the Qur’an to the Prophet Muhammad and then Muhammad would read it back to Angel Gabriel (Muslim, Sahih Muslim,1998). To further reinforce this, Al Suyuti in his Al-Itqan (Al Suyuti, Jalal al Din, 1991) and Al Nawawi in his Al Tibyan (Al Nawawi, Yahya, 2002) have given some examples of how the early generations would read and then further implement the Qur’anic verses.

 

From these examples, we can establish the importance of the Qur’an and its status in the eyes of the companions of the Prophet Muhammad. However, this example of the pious predecessors is not inherent in mindset of a great percentage of the Muslim community because they feel that it is sufficient for the children to complete the Qur’an in recitation by any means possible. In addition, the most striking thing which I have observed is that the parents will thrive on this point that their children have completed the Qur’an many times, yet they do not understand a single word from it. We have many mosques and community centres and homes where the Qur’an is being repeatedly read and memorised yet the main purpose and the main essence of it still remains untouched.

 

This point however does not discredit those organisations that teach the Qur’an in a systematic way. However, even if the teaching was developed the mosques still do not have a curriculum or a unified programme with other mosques and organisations, especially with regards to the teaching method of the Qur’an. This is due to many factors; one of these factors is the different ideologies and sects within the Muslim community mentioned earlier in the article. This disallows having the possibility of a unified curriculum and syllabus.

 

The other factors are to do with which background you are from, even though you are resident in the United Kingdom. It has been argued by many of my colleagues that most mosques seem be run by people who are from the similar background linking them all to one tribe, family or clan emanating from their homeland. This ultimately brings along its consequences and implications because these same people will only allow an Imam who is from their own background. For arguments sake if an individual from a different group would apply for the role of Imam, then his application would be rejected. If not, then he would have a diminutive role within the mosque to discharge his duties. This ISSN 2039-2117 (online) ISSN 2039-9340 (print) Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences MCSER Publishing, Rome-Italy Vol 5 No 16 July 2014 316 ultimately leads to poor delivery of teaching and being very counterproductive in delivering to the students who have enrolled.

 

As previously mentioned, the main focus of the teaching Qur’an in the United Kingdom is primarily on the basic alphabet and thereafter the individual is encouraged to begin reading the Qur’an. This style of teaching totally ignores the quality of recitation and teaching with the rules of Tajwid. Unfortunately, this would ultimately defeat the main conditions of reciting the Qur’an. The Qur’an needs to be taught in such a manner which encapsulates the main purpose derived from the verse in Surah Sad.

 

If this is done in this manner then the purpose of the Qur’an is achieved and hopefully rewarded. However, what is lacking is this focus on the purpose of the Qur’an, which therefore leaves the individual or in this case the student with no knowledge of what he/she is reciting. More focus is exerted on the quantity rather than the quality. Furthermore, another point to consider here is the time constraints and the quantity of students in a Qur’an class. Due to the timetable, school time starts at 9 am and ends at 3.30pm. By the time the children arrives home it is time to prepare and get ready for the mosque, which again differ with regards to opening times, some may even start at 4 pm, 4.30 pm and 5 pm and continue till 7 pm or even 7.30pm. These two hours the child spends in the mosque, with other children learning the Qur’an who on average total 15-20 in numbers (sometimes even more).

 

This means that the individual child will have spent no more than ten minutes with the teacher. It is safe to conclude here that the quality of teaching will be low, especially if you have limited time and a large number of students since each individual needs to be taught according to their own ability. In terms of the work given for the next day it is the responsibility of the parents to ensure that their children are regular and consistent with their work and they are also responsible to ensure that this is done at home prior to their child’s arrival to the mosque the day after. However, through my own experience, there are a few concerned parents who ensure that their children perform and fulfil their homework but majority are totally oblivious to their child’s Quranic education. It is seldom I have had parents approaching me to ask how their children are performing, which again reflects upon the understanding of the parents and how much interest they show for their child’s welfare and education.

 

4. The Pitfalls In Implementation Of Quranic Education

In United Kingdom So far, the discussion above, I am sure from the perspective of others who share my thoughts, seems to argue that there needs to be a more unified system and curriculum in the United Kingdom. This would not only accommodate the children but also the adults and parents of the Muslim community in order to appreciate and fulfil the purpose of the Qur’anic verse in chapter Sad. However, what has been stated previously was focused on learning how to read the Qur’an. There is also a need to emphasise the memorisation, which is as I would argue a Muslim tradition.

 

The art of memorisation existed and was a common trend in the pre-Islamic era and remained important after the advent of the Prophet Muhammad till today. Memorising from a young age benefits the individual long term and helps in memorizing any text whether in Arabic, English etc. Accordingly, there seems to be separate classes for memorization in the United Kingdom. Depending on the locality, there may be a high demand and some of them may even start early morning before school for one hour then after school e.g. 5pm till 8pm 5 days or even 7 days of the week.

 

The Muslim community today in Britain has many Huffaz (Memorizers) of the Qur’an. Each individual will perform Tarawih in the month of Ramadan in mosque, community centre, at home or maybe go abroad because of the huge demand for someone to lead the prayer. However, the pinnacle of this discussion is that main purpose of understanding the Qur’an and its implementation remains. Through the light of the verse in chapter Sad it clearly states the purpose of the Qur’an in terms of recitation, pondering/reflection and paying heed.

 

There is no doubt that there is reward in recitation but by fulfilling the rules of Tajwid, which Muslims believe is an act of worship itself. However, with regards to its implementation the mosques, community centres and schools in the United Kingdom, which as part of the educational policy impart the teaching of the Qur’an, need to consider the following:

 

1. To have teachers who are familiar with the social settings and background of the community, hence the wider community. This implies that the teachers are not from abroad and they should be familiar with the system and methods of teaching hence they should be fluent in English.

 

2. Teachers should be kind hearted and loving towards their students and be able to accommodate their student’s needs.

 

3. Teachers should be familiar with students who have special needs as everyone has different abilities.

 

4. Parents need to show more responsibility and awareness towards their children’s Qur’anic education.

 

5. Parents need to create a link with the teacher and work in tandem with the work set out for the child.

 

6. The committees of the mosques regardless of the different ideologies are required to consider the welfare and future of their children’s Qur’anic education and to put aside their differences, which is creating a great confusion amongst the Muslim youth and children.

 

7. The committees need to work in tandem and are required to unify a curriculum and syllabus, which can accommodate a child who moves from one mosque to another or from one city to another.

 

8. The committees also needs to ensure that students are rewarded for their achievements and given commendations on a regular basis and this can be done if all the teachers of an institute work in tandem and have regular meetings with parents and children to discuss their progress and work on any difficult areas where the child needs assistance.

 

9. Great emphasis needs to be exerted in understanding the Qur’an which is key for the child in order for him/her to develop and grow into a peace loving Muslim.

 

5. Conclusion

These suggestions are based upon personal experience as a researcher of Quranic Education in the United Kingdom. However, there has been a wide changes in certain areas of the country in regards to the teaching of the Qur’an. Certain organisations do have a system and to understand the Qur’an, they have text books which elucidate certain verses of the Qur’an, which makes it far more enjoyable then mere reading in a repetitive fashion.

 

The introduction of online courses for the Qur’an and its sciences alongside recitation and TV programmes, have also proven to be profoundly affective for anyone willing to learn the Qur’an. As an individual, parent and teacher, in my opinion, if the Muslim community wherever they are, work in solidarity and are conscious of their children’s welfare and future, focus on this one verse of the Qur’an in chapter Sad, then I am optimistic there is a bright future . It is stated in the Qur’an. This Quran does show the straightest way.

 

References

 

Abdel Haleem M.A.S (2010). The Quran: English Translation. Oxford University Press. 17.9 Abdullah al-Qari Haji Salleh. (1988).

 

Kursus qari dan qariah. Kota Bharu: Pustaka Aman Press Sdn. Bhd. Abdullah Ishak. (1995). Pendidikan Islam dan pengaruhnya di Malaysia. Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka. Abdullah Saeed. (2008).

 

The Qur’an, (London: Routledge), pp.22-34. Akbar s. Ahmed, Islam Today, (London: I. B. Tauris), 2001, p.234 Al Nawawi, Yahya. (2002).

 

Al Tibyan fi Adab Hamalat al Quran, (Beirut Lebanon: Muassasa al Risala,), p.78-94 Al Suyuti, Jalal al Din. (1991).

 

Al Itqan fi cUlum al Qu’ran, (Beirut Lebanon: Dar al Kutub al cIlmiya), p.388-389. Al-Abrasyi, Mohd Athiyah. (1969).

 

Al-tarbiyah al-Islamiyah wafalasifatuha. Kaherah: Isaa al-Bab al-Halabi Al-Ghazali, Muhammad. (1993).

 

Kaifa nataamul maaal Quran. Kaherah: Dar al-Wafa’ al-Nawawi Yahya. (2002).

 

Al-Tibyan fi Adab Hamalat al-Quran. Beirut Lebanon: Muassasa al-Risalah. p 78-94. al-Sayuti, Jalal al Din. (1991).

 

Al-Itqan Fi Ulum al-Quran. Beirut Lebanon: Dar al-Kutub al-Ilmiya. P 388 -389 Amjad Hussain. (2007).

 

Saving the Crisis of Islam in Higher Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Special Islam Edition, Number 2, pp.267-273. Ghazali Basri. (1991).

 

Pendidikan Islam dalam sistem pendidikan kebangsaan: satu analisis. Jurnal Pendidikan Islam. Jilid 4: Disember. Halim Na’am. (2005).

 

Pelaksanaan j-Qaf. Prosiding Wacana Pendidikan Islam Siri ke-4. Fakulti Pendidikan: Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. Kementerian Pelajaran Malaysia. (2005).

 

Modul pengajaran pendidikan Islam. Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka M. A. S. Abdel Haleem,. (2010). The Qur’an: English Translation, (Oxford: Oxford University Press), 38:.29. Martin Van Bruinessen, (2003),

 

Making and Unmaking Muslim Religious Authority in Western Europe, ISIM Mohd Salleh Lebar. (1992). Perubahan dan kemajuan pendidikan di Malaysia. Kuala Lumpur. Nurin Enterprise. Nasar Meer. (2007).

 

Muslim Schools in Britain: Challenging mobilizations or logical developments, Asia Pacific Journal of Education, Vol. 27, No. 1, , pp. 55–71.

Netherland, p.7. P. Lewis, Islamic Britain, New York: I. B. Tauris & Co. Ltd), 2002, p.56. Peter Mandaville. (2007).

 

Islamic Education in Britain: Approaches to Religious Knowledge in a Pluralistic Society’ in Hefner, Robert & Qasim, Muhammad Zaman (eds.), Schooling Islam; the Culture and Politics of Modern Islam, (Oxford & Princeton: Princeton University Press, p.230 Rosnani Hashim. (2001).

 

Kurikulum pendidikan dari perspektif Islam dalam konteks pendidikan di Malaysia. Jurnal Pendidikan Islam. Jilid 9, Bil 4: November. Sahih Muslim. 1988. Hadith no 6009. Riyadh Saudi Arabia: Darus Salam.

 

Intensive Quran learning course for women and girls

Dar Al Ber helps females aged between eight and 60 revise memorisation of the entire Quran

Dubai: A number of females aged eight to 60 joined an intensive Quran learning course as part of Dar Al Ber Society’s innovative scheme with the Humaid Bin Rashid Al Nuaimi Centre for Quran Service.

Up to 102 female memorisers from Ajman and Sharjah were enrolled in the course at Shaikh Zayed Mosque in Al Jurf Area, which aims to help learners revise memorisation of the entire Quran during Ramadan.

emale-quran-teacher

The Quran Memorisation Project for Females, part of the sixth edition of a multi-branch Quran course, has helped the women revise 20, 15, 10, and five volumes of the Quran comprising 30 volumes and offers a special class for tajweed or art of recitation.

As many as 259 learners are enrolled in the course in the emirates of Dubai, Ajman and Ras Al Khaimah. Graduates got certificates on course completion while some learners are accredited to teach Quran as per the Hafs and Shuaba Rewayas or schools of recitation.

The Quran Memorisation Project is meant to help students better memorise and recite the Quran, understand its meaning and principles, and produce competent teachers with sound methodology.

Moza Naseeb, General Coordinator of The Ber Quran Memorisation Project for Females, paid tribute to the Humaid Bin Rashid Al Nuaimi Centre for Quran Service for supporting the programme and teaching the Quran to as many learners as possible.

“The course is in line with the teachings of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) who used to study the Quran every day during Ramadan with angel Jibril,” she said.

Dar Al Ber already runs a number of diverse courses on teaching accreditation, Jazriya for Tajweed art, scientific textbooks on memorisation, children’s guidebook for Quran memorisation, foreign community classes, as well as winter and summer courses.

Guf News